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Welcome back. Today, I will be telling you about our second day in Iguazu.

We spent our second day at the Iguazu Waterfalls on the Argentinian side. To get there, you can either take a bus (long and expensive) or a taxi, which is what we did. We met the driver on our ride home the day before, and he gave us an amazing price. It was also cool because of the border process, as he was used to it and told us exactly what we need  to do. It tends to be very simple, if you don’t need a visa for Argentina, you simply hand them your passport, and they stamp you in.

One thing to note for the National Park on the Argentinian side, is that you must pay in cash. For visitors that aren’t part of Mercosur or otherwise discount eligible, it’s 500 Argentinian Pesos. Once you go in, there are different trails to choose from, some involving a little boat ride. We started with the upper-most trail, which included a train ride up to Garganta del Diablo. This area was the most impressive and when we had some time left after seein everything else, I insisted that we should go back one more time. I stood there for probably twenty minutes in awe, remembering every little detail about these falls, and if you gave me a paintbrush, I could paint them out of my memory.

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The overwater walkway to Garganta del Diablo
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These pictures simply do not do it justice.

For our second trail, we chose ‘Paso Inferior’ (the lower trail), from which you can take a boat to Isla San Martin. On the way, I saw the exact spot that was pictured in the postcard I bought earlier. Funny note, the postcards in Iguazu were the cheapest I ever bought in my life! One postcard was only one peso. Going back to our lower trail however, there were some parts and corners we did not go to, as our focus was on Isla San Martin, from where you can walk right in front of the waterfalls that you see from above, if you chose the ‘Paso Superior’. The boat leaves every fifteen minutes and the crossing is included in the entry fee. If you want to get closer by boat, there is another company offering rides, but we were most excited about seeing the waterfalls. I read somehwere that the Island can be closed if tides are too high, but if it is open, I would really recommend you go and see the waterfalls from the little platform on there. The views are stunning.

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Beautiful high waterlevels
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Terrace falls towards the right side of the island

The last trail we did before going to Garganta del Diablo again was the ‘Paso Superior’. Out of all the trails, I found this one to be the least scenic, as you were basically walking along the edges, where the water fell. The surrounding landscape however was beautiful. My favorite thing were all the animals I saw, butterflies, salamanders, different kinds of birds and my personal highlight; a tucan. For a while, a little butterfly landed on my hand and I carried him with me. Shortly after I called him “Joseph”, he flew off my hand and landed on the ground. As I was trying to pick him up again, a lizard ran out of nowhere and ate Joseph in front of my eyes. 🙁

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Little Joseph, before he was eaten

Even though I lost my little friend, the day on the Argentinian side of Iguazu could not have been better. I can see why people would prefer the Argentinian over the Brazilian side, but I really enjoyed both. One thing I want to note especially are the amazing rainbows. In those two days we spent in Iguazu, I saw more rainbows than ever before in my life. I assume it is because of the way the water breaks (and us being blessed with sunshine). Sadly, I would have had to jump in to find a pot of gold, so , I settled with the beautiful sights.

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No pots of gold to get here